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lophophora and the winter

Posted by Patrick Hijos-Calvo on

lophophora and the winter

As winter is coming I recommend to all lophophoras lovers living in areas with cold winter not to let your cactus outside during this season. They are not supposed to bear very cold temperature and they may freeze and die. You have 2 solutions. You can keep your lophophora dormant. It will then stop growing during its dormant period, save up its energy. It can wake up with more vigorous energy and also can stimulate flower production. Keep them in a place without light that is about 45-50°F or 10°C, do not water them during the dormancy. You can also...

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Peyote cactus in Thailand. Astrophytum, lophophora, ariocarpus and many more.

Posted by Patrick Hijos-Calvo on

Peyote cactus in Thailand. Astrophytum, lophophora, ariocarpus and many more.

A few shots of the day we spent on June 9th at the "cactus and succulent fair event". Peyote cactus were present here and also a huge number of beautiful specimen from other species as well, so we had to go there and have a look and say hello to some friends there. We couldn't have our stand here that day, too busy lately we missed the opportunity. We had a wonderful day with all the friendly sellers, we had a really good time  with some old friends and also met other new fantastic people there. Beautiful plants everywhere, ariocarpus,...

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How to get peyote seeds?

Posted by Patrick Hijos-Calvo on

How to get peyote seeds?

Of course you can buy lophophora williamsii seeds, but you can also get them from your own peyote cactus. Lophophora will naturally produce a fruit containing seeds after its flower stops blooming, so never put out a dry flower.It can take a few days to 1 month or more for the fruit to come, sometimes it never comes, nature decides to make it happen or not.The fruit usually contains 5-10 seeds and if cross-pollinated, the number can increase to 20 or more seeds. The cross-pollination process is made naturally when a bee comes to get some pollen from one lophophora then goes to another lophophora (have to be a different specie) looking for more pollen and at this stage the bee transfers the pollen from one plant to another one. This process can make a change in the dna of the future plant and new species can come to life if the seeds germinate and...

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Peyote seeds germination

Posted by Patrick Hijos-Calvo on

Propagating Peyote from seeds is a really rewarding experience but require great patience as lophophora williamsii is a really slow growing cactus. Peyote seeds can remain viable for years if kept dormant in a dry and dark place. You can get seeds from your own cactus plant or here, mature lophophora williamsii flower in response to watering and harvesting will produce a pink fruit containing 6-10 seeds, I sometimes got up to 30 seeds per pod by out crossing them. Peyote flowers should be fertilized with a small paint brush. I practice out crossing to get the most fertile seeds. I transfer some...

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